In 2008 Dr Bo Da obtained a BS in Physics from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) and in 2013 a PhD in physics from the same university. In November 2013 he moved to the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) (Tsukuba, Japan) as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow, becoming in January 2015 an ICYS Researcher at their International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS), and finally in December 2016 becoming a Researcher in the Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2). He has been engaged in developing novel measurement-analysis methods to extract more information from measured spectra by surface analysis techniques. For instance, he developed the reverse Monte Carlo method to extract optical constant of bulk material from measured surface electron spectra, and the extended Mermin method to determine low energy electron mean free path of bulk material. Most recently, Da’s research focus has been largely related to development of new measurement-analysis method for nanomaterial samples. The virtual substrate method developed by him represents a benchmark for surface analysis to provide “free-standing” information about supported nanomaterials, and brought him President’s Prize awarded by NIMS. He has had ten first-author papers related to these new methods published in various journals, including Nature Communications, Physical Review Letters and Journal of Applied Physics, among others.


Virtual substrate method for nanomaterials characterization

Bo Da1,2,3*

1Magnet Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan

2Surface Chemical Analysis Group, Nano Characterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan

3Data Science Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan

*DA.Bo@nims.go.jp

         Characterization techniques available for bulk or thin-film solid-state materials have been extended to substrate-supported nanomaterials, but generally non-quantitatively. This is because the nanomaterial signals are inevitably buried in the signals from the underlying substrate in common reflection-configuration techniques. Here, we propose a virtual substrate method [1], inspired by the four-point probe technique [2] for resistance measurement as well as the chop-nod method [3] in infrared astronomy, to characterize nanomaterials without the influence of underlying substrate signals from four interrelated measurements. This method in secondary electron (SE) microscopy, a SE spectrum (white electrons) associated with the reflectivity difference between two different substrates can be tracked and controlled. The SE spectrum is used to quantitatively investigate the covering nanomaterial based on subtle changes in the transmission of the nanomaterial with high efficiency rivaling that of conventional core-level electrons. The virtual substrate method represents a benchmark for surface analysis to provide “free-standing” information about supported nanomaterials.


References

[1] Da, B. et al. Virtual substrate method for nanomaterials characterization. Nature Communication, 8, 15629 (2017).

[2] Miccoli, I., Edler, F., Pfnür, H., & Tegenkamp C. The 100th anniversary of the four-point probe technique: the role of probe geometries in isotropic and anisotropic systems. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 27, 223201 (2015).

[3] Glass, S. Handbook of Infrared Astronomy. (Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1999).

Acknowledgements

The full list of co-author is: Bo Da, Jiangwei Liu, Mahito Yamamoto, Yoshihiro Ueda, Kazuyuki Watanabe, Thanhcuong Nguyen, Songlin Li, Kazuhito Tsukagoshi, Hideki Yoshikawa, Hideo Iwai, Shigeo Tanuma, Hongxuan Guo, Zhaoshun Gao, Xia Sun & Zejun Ding.

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